EYSIER SIG Conferences & 

Workshops programme here 

Book free place here

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1st EYSIER SIG Conference Video here

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2nd EYSIER SIG Conference Video here

Committed to Excellence

 
 
 
 
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6th EYSIER Conference video here.

 
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7th EYSIER Conference & workshop.

Video here

Abstract

When it comes to understanding the role of children building narratives, much of their understanding of self-hood in classrooms and particularly during lockdowns of Covid 19 is based on the present. There is little information concerning children's plans for the near future, the distant future and there is not much information concerning their reflections on their past experiences or events that inform the present. Children's personal narratives rarely contain information concerning the ideal self, the duty-bound self and the possible self. In the early childhood these aspects of the self, especially the duty-bound  self,  are constructed  mainly  on  the  basis  of  

external  information,  received  from  important people. From the children’s perspective these are not very significant. The talk presents ways parents can transform children from not valuing the self of the past and the self in becoming, to valuing the self of the past and the self of the future. The talk also examines how talk between parent and child can examine the values of the duty-bound self mapped to prime principles such as trust, seeking truth, generating knowledge through language, being inclusionary, being tolerant of different and opposing views that do no harm to the self or the other, and participating in the co-construction of a just classroom rules in fully explicit ways. So building a narrative means understanding why we do what we do rather than being told to do something in a particular way by an important other. Understanding ‘why’ gives deeper meanings to building narratives that reflect on the consequences of the past that affect the present, and inform the narrative building of the future. Knowing the self using these narratives can lead to a sense of language that provides security in selfhood, or identity, enabling the self to deeply listen to the narratives of others. Being self-aware and having self-control and being able to regulate the self, based on self-evaluation of the past, are important characteristics for a "quiet ego", that enable children to establish and attain realistic goals. Children who are not self-focused and have realistic expectations understand the self on a deeper level in relation to the other, and are more likely to share control with others in the building of a safe classrooms with just rules for all. Thus far A Blueprint for Character Development for Evolution has been provided in the EYSIER SIG conferences and workshops as a tool box to solve problems. The stages of ABCDE (Taysum, 2020, p.76) crucially map to stages of character development on a scalable rubric of a person’s transition from immaturity to maturity as follows: 

A obeys rules driven by fear or to get even to avoid punishment and little care for others leading to egoist intentions and acts that perpetuate poverty gaps, violence and even war;

B Obeys rules underpinned by beliefs that it is important to do things right but does not know why leading to confusion and perpetuating poverty gaps, violence and even war;

C Obeys rules and chooses to do duty within classroom rules and the law with methods to gather data to inform how to act/respond to stimuli and the likely consequences of different responses. The methods find out how others have done the right thing leading to understanding what the classroom rules are and why that informs future narratives of living a good life in a good social contract for equity, renewal and economic and social wellbeing for all; 

D) Obeys rules and chooses to do duty within the classroom rules and develops plans for how to act that can be tested to prove if they work or not which builds a groundwork of good decision making in many different contexts of the classroom. This leads to understanding narratives and the self-hood within

the classroom rules are and why, that informs future narratives of the self-hood with a quiet ego, living a good life in a good social contract for equity, renewal and economic and social wellbeing for all;

E Obeys rules and connects duties with rights and inquiry into doing the right thing (moral inquiry) into the ethics of the classroom rules and has arrived at universal ethical principles applied to the social life that have stood the test of time using Taysum (2019) Assessment for Personal and Social Moral Inquiry. 

As stated above, important people telling children to develop these narratives and expecting them to memorise them will not move children past Stage A in their Character Development and the ideal self, duty bound self and the possible self will remain stuck in the present and vulnerable to exploitation and harm by others. Thus, this talk focuses on how to use ABCDE to facilitate self-reflection through talk to build children’s confidence and well-being and their capacity ‘to build their narrative and get to know themselves’ in communities of all Faiths and None in a Secular Society Using ABCDE.

References 


Bruner, J. (1983) Child’s Talk; Learning to Use Language. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 

Kesebir, P. (2014). A quiet ego quiets death anxiety: Humility as an existential anxiety buffer. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 106(4), 610-623.

Taysum, A., Beutner, M., Kallioniemi, A., Canfarotta, D., Casado Muñoz, R., Ruşitoru, M., Hysa, F., Pathak, R.,  Mynbayeva, A., Yelbayeva, Z.,  Timchenko, V. Trapitsin, S., Pogosian, V., Tropinova, E., Ueda, M., Newton, P., Saboor, A., McGuinness, S. (2020) ‘EYSIER Charter Mark with ABCDE and Assessment for Personal and Social Learning; a bottom-up approach to building faculty of judgement with an Open Access knowledge base of Science with and for Society (SwafS)’, in European Journal of Social Sciences Education and Research 3 (2) 129-150 available at: http://journals.euser.org/index.php/ejed/article/view/4704

Taysum, A. (2020) Education Policy as a Road Map to Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. Scarborough: Emerald.

Uszy  ́nska-Jarmoc (2020) The Conceptions of Self in Children’s Narratives in Early child Development and Care, 174 (1) 81-97. 

 

Facilitating Self-Reflection Through Talk to Build Children’s Confidence and Well-being and their capacity ‘to build their narrative and get to know themselves’ in communities of all Faiths and None in a Secular Society Using ABCDE.

6th July 2021 Professor Marc Beutner


When it comes to understanding the role of children building their narratives, much of their understanding of the self-hood in classrooms, and particularly during lockdowns of Covid 19 is based on the present. There is little information concerning  children's  plans  for  the near  future, the distant future  and  there  is  not  much  information concerning their reflections on their past experiences or events that inform the present. Children’s personal narratives rarely contain information concerning the ideal self, the duty-bound self and the possible self. In the  early  childhood  these  aspects  of  the  self,  especially  the  duty-bound  self,  are constructed  mainly  on  the  basis  of  external  information,  received  from  important people. From the children’s perspective these are not very significant. The talk presents ways can parents transform children from not valuing the self of the past and the self in becoming, to valuing the self of the past and the self of the future. The talk also examines how talk between parent and child can examine the values of the duty-bound self mapped to prime principles such as trust, seeking truth, generating knowledge through language, being inclusionary, being tolerant of different and opposing views that do no harm to the self or the other, and participating in the co-construction of a just classroom rules in fully explicit ways. So building a narrative means understanding why we do what we do rather than being told to do something in a particular way by an important other. Understanding ‘why’ gives deeper meanings to building narratives that reflect on the consequences of the past that affect the present, and inform the narrative building of the future. Knowing the self using these narratives can lead to a sense of language that provides security in selfhood, or identity, enabling the self to deeply listen to the narratives of others. Being self-aware and having self-control and being able to regulate the self, based on self-evaluation of the past, are important characteristics for a "quiet ego", that enable children to establish and attain realistic goals. Children who are not self-focused and have realistic expectations understand the self on a deeper level in relation to the other, and are more likely to share control with others in the building of a safe classrooms with just rules for all. Thus far A Blueprint for Character Development for Evolution has been provided in the EYSIER SIG conferences and workshops as a tool box to solve problems. The stages of ABCDE (Taysum, 2020, p.76) crucially map to stages of character development on a scalable rubric of a person’s transition from immaturity to maturity as follows: 


A obeys rules driven by fear or to get even to avoid punishment and little care for others leading to egoist intentions and acts that perpetuate poverty gaps, violence and even war;

B Obeys rules underpinned by beliefs that it is important to do things right but does not know why leading to confusion and perpetuating poverty gaps, violence and even war;

C Obeys rules and chooses to do duty within classroom rules and the law with methods to gather data to inform how to act/respond to stimuli and the likely consequences of different responses. The methods find out how others have done the right thing leading to understanding what the classroom rules are and why that informs future narratives of living a good life in a good social contract for equity, renewal and economic and social wellbeing for all; 

D) Obeys rules and chooses to do duty within the classroom rules and develops plans for how to act that can be tested to prove if they work or not which builds a groundwork of good decision making in many different contexts of the classroom. This leads to understanding narratives and the self-hood within the classroom rules are and why, that informs future narratives of the self-hood with a quiet ego, living a good life in a good social contract for equity, renewal and economic and social wellbeing for all;

E Obeys rules and connects duties with rights and inquiry into doing the right thing (moral inquiry) into the ethics of the classroom rules and has arrived at universal ethical principles applied to the social life that have stood the test of time using Taysum (2019) Assessment for Personal and Social Moral Inquiry. 

References

Allen. G. (2011) Early intervention: the next steps: an independent report to HM Government. London: The Cabinet Office. Bergin, C. and Bergin, D. (2009) Attachment in the Classroom. Educational Psychology Review, 21, 141-170. 

Bombèr, L. (2007) Inside I’m Hurting; Practical Strategies for Supporting Children with Attachment Difficulties in Schools. London: Worth Publishing. 

Bombèr, L (2011) What about me? Inclusive strategies to support pupils with attachment difficulties make it through the school day. London: Worth Publishing. 

Bowlby, J. (1958). The nature of the child’s tie to his mother. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 39, 350-371.

Bowlby J. (1969). Attachment. Attachment and loss: Vol. 1. Loss. New York: Basic Books.

Pekrun, R., and Stephens, E. (2009) Goals Emotions and Emotion Regulations: Perspectives of the Control-Value Theory in Human Development 52 357-365.

Traxson, D. (1999) De-stressing children in the classroom in Ed Jane Leadbetter ‘Applying Psychology in the Classroom’. London: Routledge.

Taysum, A. (2020) Education Policy for a A Roadmap to Achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Effecting a Paradigm Shift for Peace and Prosperity. Scarborough: Emerald.

Taysum, A., Beutner, M., Kallioniemi, A., Canfarotta, D., Casado Muñoz, R., Ruşitoru, M., Hysa, F., Pathak, R.,  Mynbayeva, A., Yelbayeva, Z.,  Timchenko, V. Trapitsin, S., Pogosian, V., Tropinova, E., Ueda, M., Newton, P., Saboor, A., McGuinness, S. (2020) ‘EYSIER Charter Mark with ABCDE and Assessment for 

rnals.euser.org/index.php/ejed/article/view/4704

 

Facilitating Self-Reflection Through Talk to Build Children’s Confidence and Well-being and their capacity ‘to build their narrative and get to know themselves’ in communities of all Faiths and None in a Secular Society Using ABCDE.


6th July 2021 7.00 pm - 8.30 pm London Time 


When it comes to understanding the role of children building their narratives, much of their understanding of the self-hood in classrooms, and particularly during lockdowns of Covid 19 is based on the present. There is little information concerning  children's  plans  for  the near  future, the distant future  and  there  is  not  much  information concerning their reflections on their past experiences or events that inform the present. Children’s personal narratives rarely contain information concerning the ideal self, the duty-bound self and the possible self. In the  early  childhood  these  aspects  of  the  self,  especially  the  duty-bound  self,  are constructed  mainly  on  the  basis  of  external  information,  received  from  important people. From the children’s perspective these are not very significant. The talk presents ways can parents transform children from not valuing the self of the past and the self in becoming, to valuing the self of the past and the self of the future. The talk also examines how talk between parent and child can examine the values of the duty-bound self mapped to prime principles such as trust, seeking truth, generating knowledge through language, being inclusionary, being tolerant of different and opposing views that do no harm to the self or the other, and participating in the co-construction of a just classroom rules in fully explicit ways. So building a narrative means understanding why we do what we do rather than being told to do something in a particular way by an important other. Understanding ‘why’ gives deeper meanings to building narratives that reflect on the consequences of the past that affect the present, and inform the narrative building of the future. Knowing the self using these narratives can lead to a sense of language that provides security in selfhood, or identity, enabling the self to deeply listen to the narratives of others. Being self-aware and having self-control and being able to regulate the self, based on self-evaluation of the past, are important characteristics for a "quiet ego", that enable children to establish and attain realistic goals. Children who are not self-focused and have realistic expectations understand the self on a deeper level in relation to the other, and are more likely to share control with others in the building of a safe classrooms with just rules for all. Thus far A Blueprint for Character Development for Evolution has been provided in the EYSIER SIG conferences and workshops as a tool box to solve problems. The stages of ABCDE (Taysum, 2020, p.76) crucially map to stages of character development on a scalable rubric of a person’s transition from immaturity to maturity as follows: 


A obeys rules driven by fear or to get even to avoid punishment and little care for others leading to egoist intentions and acts that perpetuate poverty gaps, violence and even war;

B Obeys rules underpinned by beliefs that it is important to do things right but does not know why leading to confusion and perpetuating poverty gaps, violence and even war;

C Obeys rules and chooses to do duty within classroom rules and the law with methods to gather data to inform how to act/respond to stimuli and the likely consequences of different responses. The methods find out how others have done the right thing leading to understanding what the classroom rules are and why that informs future narratives of living a good life in a good social contract for equity, renewal and economic and social wellbeing for all; 

D) Obeys rules and chooses to do duty within the classroom rules and develops plans for how to act that can be tested to prove if they work or not which builds a groundwork of good decision making in many different contexts of the classroom. This leads to understanding narratives and the self-hood within the classroom rules are and why, that informs future narratives of the self-hood with a quiet ego, living a good life in a good social contract for equity, renewal and economic and social wellbeing for all;

E Obeys rules and connects duties with rights and inquiry into doing the right thing (moral inquiry) into the ethics of the classroom rules and has arrived at universal ethical principles applied to the social life that have stood the test of time using Taysum (2019) Assessment for Personal and Social Moral Inquiry. 

As stated above, important people telling children to develop these narratives and expecting them to memorise them will not move children past Stage A in their Character Development and the ideal self, duty bound self and the possible self will remain stuck in the present and vulnerable to exploitation and harm by others. Thus, this talk focuses on how to use ABCDE to facilitate self-reflection through talk to build children’s confidence and well-being and their capacity ‘to build their narrative and get to know themselves’ in communities of all Faiths and None in a Secular Society Using ABCDE.

References

Bruner, J. (1983) Child’s Talk; Learning to Use Language. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 

Kesebir, P. (2014). A quiet ego quiets death anxiety: Humility as an existential anxiety buffer. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 106(4), 610-623.

Taysum, A., Beutner, M., Kallioniemi, A., Canfarotta, D., Casado Muñoz, R., Ruşitoru, M., Hysa, F., Pathak, R.,  Mynbayeva, A., Yelbayeva, Z.,  Timchenko, V. Trapitsin, S., Pogosian, V., Tropinova, E., Ueda, M., Newton, P., Saboor, A., McGuinness, S. (2020) ‘EYSIER Charter Mark with ABCDE and Assessment for Personal and Social Learning; a bottom-up approach to building faculty of judgement with an Open Access knowledge base of Science with and for Society (SwafS)’, in European Journal of Social Sciences Education and Research 3 (2) 129-150 available at: http://journals.euser.org/index.php/ejed/article/view/4704

Taysum, A. (2020) Education Policy as a Road Map to Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. Scarborough: Emerald.

Uszy  ́nska-Jarmoc (2020) The Conceptions of Self in Children’s Narratives in Early child Development and Care, 174 (1) 81-97.